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Yeti Communications Ltd  (Est 2005) is a New Zealand and Indonesian based company

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                                                                                                            NEW ZEALAND CB RADIO HISTORY PAGE

Content on this page is accredited to  Mike "SSL-100"  who abridged the information in 2002

Mike originally posted this information on his now old defunct website  (www.ssl100.co.nz)  it was reposted here on ww.yeticomnz.com in 2004  with his permission  with updates to the information as the years go by

Some information is extracted from the C.B.R.A.NZ. log book and from the radio spectrum management (RSM) cb radio rule book .

The Citizen Radio Service was established to meet the need for a short range means of communication for personal or business use which could not be
economically or practicably met by other communication services, and has existed in New Zealand since 1953, being one of the first of this type in
the world.
Originally only 1 channel (26.500 MHZ) was available with a power limit of 0.5 watts.

In 1963 the number channels were increased to 7, all in the 26 MHZ frequency band. 1966 the number of channels was further increased to 11
channels for general use and 3 for Government, including approved businesses and persons. Power increased to 2 Watts.

Proposals to extend the Citizen Band service were released to the public in June 1987 and from the resulting submissions, changes were made. Details of
the new 40 channel service was announced by Dr Cullen at the June 1988 annual conference of the Citizen Band Radio Association of New Zealand,
coming into effect 1 July 1988. October 1988, any type of aerials were allowed, including beams.

1993 the Radio Frequency Service requested CBRANZ to forward a submission for a PRS Citizen Radio Service (UHF CB). CBRANZ forwarded a submission
based on its 1978 submission sent to Post Office Communications for a UHF CB Citizen Service in addition to the then AM CB. 1 July 1994, Personal Radio
Service in the 476 - 477 MHZ UHF frequencies extended the Citizen Radio Service. Introduction of PRS was to improve options to the general public to
provide an economical radio service for small users in remote areas not already covered by other systems. Possible use includes sporting and
community events, small businesses and hobby activities. Repeaters also allowed on the PRS service but require a separate licence.

So that the services may be freely utilised, regulatory requirements have been kept to the minimum and no operator qualifications deemed necessary Up
until 31 March 1993 the radio set was licensed. Each licensed set was issued with a licence consisting of the district prefix followed by a number ie. AK
1234 The original licence fee was $3.00, rising over the years to $45.00. 1 April 1993 saw set licensing replaced by a General Licence, this licences
the operator. Licence fees abolished. All sets still had to comply with the Specifications as laid down for the Citizens Band and Personal Radio Service
before being used on these services.

CB licensed sets peaked at 46,000 plus, during 1977 - 84, and this figure does not include Government sets. At 1 April 1993, (last recorded figures
available) there were 14,600 CB sets licensed. Many operators and clubs now use both CB and PRS.

1953:: CB established in New Zealand.... 1 channel AM.... 26.500 MHZ, watt
Aerial wave.

1966:: Channels increased to 7 (set above and below 26.500 MHZ) Aerials
wave, omni directional only.

1966:: November..First New Zealand CB club.... Canterbury Citizens Band
Radio Club Inc. Licence fee $3.00

1967:: Canterbury Citizens Band Radio Club Inc becomes a registered club.
April: Second New Zealand CB club formed..... Otago Citizens Band Radio Club Inc.
June: Gorden Hammett proudes a list of 56 operators of the Christchurch area in December it was updated to 64 operators.

1968:: July a third list appeared now up to 87 operators listed.

1970:: February CH471 Graham Dacomobe travelled to the north island and returned with many more call lists from all over New Zealand this then was
the real beginning of the New Zealand list and became the 1st edition. 675 callsigns were listed.It was issued by the Canterbury C.B Radio Club.
November saw the 2nd edition with 1024 call signs listed.

1971::Alan Roswell CH 97 took over responsibility for the production of the National Call List Later changed to "Call List"

1972:: the forth edition appeared printed commercially and in basically the same form it was to retain until 1979.

1974:: Licence fee $5.00 8.509 licenses registered

1975:: Meeting held Nelson Labour Weekend to try and form a National Body 9842 licenses registered

1976:: Labour Weekend.. Great eyeball at Auckland. Formation of a National Body mooted 12,356 licenses registered

1977:: May 14 Inaugural meeting of NZ Citizens Band Radio Association.
November Name changed to Citizens Band Radio Association of New Zealand (CBRANZ) 15,267licenses registered

1978:: Channels increased to 14. 11 general for normal CB, 3 reserved for Government and special allocations. Power increased to 2 watts. Channels
centred on 26.500. September. Ownership of Citizen Band Call Book presented to CBRANZ by CH 97.21,220 licenses registered. "CEEBEE WORLD" mag has its
first issue. Release of the famous " Airlane mark iv (4), 12 channels up from 7channels 2 watts am only

1979: Release of Laser Communicator model 555 / A.W.A Clarion TR10/Pye SS140 12 channel 2 watt am only.

1980:: ALAN ROSWELL CH97 passes away. Release of the Airlane mark v (5) pll controlled (mc145106 pll ),12 channel 2 watt am only. licence fee $6.00

1981:: Licence fee $10.00

1984:: Licence fee $18.00

1985:: Licence fee $20.00

1986:: Licence fee $25.00

1987:: Licence fee $27 July 1. 40 Channels AM 4 Watt/SSB 12 watt PEP operation allowed. October: Beams and any other type of aerial allowed.
Licence fee $38.00

1989:: Radio communication Act & updated 1987 Radio Regulations come into
force

1990:: Licence fee $40.50.

1991:: Licence fee $45.00

1993:: April 1. licence fee abolished

1994:: July Personal Radio Service (UHF CB) introduced. No licence fee
payable. General Licence expires 31-01-99

1999:: General Licence for both CB & PRS renewed to 31-01-2004

2003:: General Licence extended, effective May 2003.

2011:Radiocommunications Regulations (General User Radio Licence for Citizen Band Radio) Notice 2011 comes into action allowing use of the usa band 26.965-27.405 mhz am/ssb

PDF file of 2011 radio regs

HF:New Zealand has two 40-channel HF CB bands available, the NZ-specific "NZ CB Band" 26.330–26.770 MHz (40 channels, AM and SSB allowed) and the standardized "mid band" 26.965–27.405 MHz (40 channels, AM and SSB allowed) for a total of 80 HF CB channels.

UHF: personal radio service aka "UHF CB" In New Zealand, the 77-channel (80 channels if you include the 3 telemetry channels) previously 40-channel UHF CB citizen's band near 476.425-477.4125 MHz  in 12.5khz steps is used for a similar purpose. In New Zealand  transceivers are "class licensed" and require no individual registration. Repeaters may be used, but these require individual station licences.

channels 1-8 are repeater output channels (however can be used for simplex in non repeater areas) channels 31 to 38 are the repeater inputs.

CBRANZ :

CONTENT BELOW THIS LINE IS ACCREDITED TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHORS AND OTAGO DAILY TIMES 2012

news paper article on closing of cbranz 

Charities win as CB radio buffs say over and out

 

 

Citizens' Band Radio Association of New Zealand secretary Arthur Driver prepares to sign off as the association prepares to close after 36 years.
The Citizens' Band Radio Association of New Zealand will be saying its final over and out next week, but Otago's Neurological Foundation and Cancer Society will be 10-4 (OK).

The CB radio organisation has been putting out mayday calls for the past decade in a bid to get new membership, but CBRANZ secretary Arthur Driver said it was time to call it a day.

Until the 1990s, CB radio was the main method of mobile communication, he said. But the popularity of mobile phones and laptops with Skype had killed its role in keeping people in touch.

"With the CB, we were limited to the town area.

"We had 'skip' which allowed us to talk to people all over the world, but that disappeared in the 1980s.

"The introduction of computers and mobile phones took away the need for CBs. It also took away the interest of the younger generation. They would rather sit at home playing video games."

At the height of CB radio's popularity in 1986, there were 56,000 registered sets in New Zealand, and the club had 200 individual members who helped provide communications for St John in the region until the organisation got its own system.

Sadly, club membership has all but dried up and the association will be officially closed at the end of the month.

Mr Driver said the club had been operation for the past 36 years, and he had served as secretary for 30 years.

"I'm a wee bit sad. I guess it's a sign of the times."

There is a silver lining among the clouds though. In signing off, the club has evenly split its $25,570 of funds and donated them to the Chair of Neurosurgery campaign and the Otago Cancer Society for research.

"They are both fantastic causes that help local people," he said.

Neurological Foundation Chair of Neurosurgery project manager Irene Mosley said it was a "considerable" amount of money, and the single biggest donation the organisation had received this month.

"While we are sad that a local organisation is winding up, we are thrilled that such an important service as neurosurgery can benefit from the work these members have done for so many years."

 Photo by Jane Dawber.


CONTENT BELOW THIS LINE IS ACCREDITED TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHORS AND Stuff.co.nz may 2018

news paper article on closing of taranaki cb radio club

https://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/104064233/over-and-out-for-taranakis-citizen-band-radio-club

Over and out for Taranaki's Citizen Band Radio Club

 

Peter Robinson says the Taranaki CB Radio Club has played a vital role in many search and rescues.

After 50 years of communicating via CB radio, it's over and out for the Taranaki Citizen Band Radio Club.

The club has closed down due to dwindling numbers of members due to health issues or death, despite the radios still being in common use.

"It's the end of the line,"Peter Robinson, one of the founding members, said.

SIMON O'CONNOR/STUFF

The equipment is still in use by police, the marine watch and alpine rescue but can't keep up with the wide-ranging functions of cellphones.

"It's come about quite suddenly.

"It's the technology that they come up with. The young ones, they're not using the radio; they're using their cellphones and computers.

"The radio can't compete with the cellphone, with the widespread activity it handles."

However, the CB radios still had their place, with the police, the marine sector and alpine rescues still communicating via citizen band.

"The cellphone can't compete with the CB radio with the contact with a higher number of people at the same time.

"If you had half a dozen sites out there and half a dozen teams everybody could hear what was going on in the situation and you didn't have to ring everybody up."

He said the club used to always have someone listening for calls. They had more than 200 members at one point and had taken part in many search and rescue operations over the years, as well as community events such as rallies.

"Every day someone was monitoring the calling channel so they weren't overlooked."

For the Waitara flood of the mid-1960s, all the telephones were out and CB radios from the Taranaki Alpine Club, private owners and the New Plymouth Yacht Club were used for reconnaissance and anti-looting parties.

Robinson said they still had the equipment but they didn't have the members to provide personnel as well.

"We just had to bite the bullet and say we can't provide the people that we used to. Two or three people on their own will be using it to help out where they can which we're grateful for."

"When the club was formed, they became efficient as a group that was properly organised to assist with important communications," former Civil Defence communications officer David Rawson wrote in a 1981 history of the CB Radio Club.

"Their hobby became a community service."

 


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